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Jono's Close-Up Magic: The Art of Reset Time.

Magicians often have what's known as "reset time" - a period dedicated to organising props and sets for future performances. This is a common aspect of magic shows, but it can eat into the overall performance time.


As a professional magician, I initially offered an hour-long performance, but found that half of that time was spent resetting my props. This meant that I wasn't able to perform for everyone at the event, so some guests missed out on the magic. To avoid this, I now typically perform for a minimum of two hours for close-up magic shows. This ensures that everyone at the event gets to experience some magic and I don't waste time resetting.


However, this rule doesn't apply to my stage show, where the entire audience is present and no reset time is required. The show can be any duration, whether it's 30 minutes or a full hour, with the only extra time being a pre-show setup. That being said, every booking is unique and I'm open to discussion and flexible to your needs.


I've performed for different durations in the past, such as at a charity event where I was asked to perform for 30 minutes while greeting guests at the door. In another instance, I performed a 15-minute magic show in Covent Garden to help a gentleman propose to his girlfriend (she said yes).


In conclusion, the 2-hour minimum requirement is not a strict rule, but a guideline to ensure that everyone at your event gets to enjoy the magic. Of course, exceptions can be made depending on the occasion and needs.


However, it is important to note that reset time is not just a simple matter of organising props and sets. It also involves preparing oneself mentally and physically for the next performance. As a magician, you need to be at the top of your game, both mentally and physically, to deliver the best performance possible. The reset time allows you to recharge, focus and be ready for the next performance.

It's also essential to keep in mind that not all magic tricks are created equal. Some tricks may be quick and easy to reset, while others may be more complex and require more time. For example, a card trick may be quick to reset, but a levitation trick may take longer due to the complex rigging involved.

In addition, the type of audience also plays a role in the reset time. A close-up magic performance, where you perform for a small group of people, may require more reset time compared to a stage performance, where you perform for a large audience. This is because the close-up performance requires more interaction with the audience, and the props and sets need to be reset between each performance.

In conclusion, the 2-hour minimum requirement for close-up magic shows is a guideline to ensure that everyone at the event gets to experience the magic. Of course, exceptions can be made, and every booking is unique, but the guideline is there to ensure that the reset time does not eat into the overall performance time and that the magician is able to deliver the best performance possible.


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